Slavery Abolition:
Slavery Abolition: 'Am I not a Woman and a Sister' anti-slavery copper token

Slavery Abolition: "Am I not a Woman and a Sister" anti-slavery copper token

Price: $175.00
Medalet opposing the enslavement of African Americans, 1838.
Catalog No: 18662
Availability: In Stock.
SIZE: 28 mm
GRADE: Choice/VF

Medalet opposing the enslavement of African Americans, 1838. Copper. Low 54. HT-81. DeWitt CE 1838-19.

OBV: A kneeling female slave in chains with uplifted arms, AM I NOT A WOMAN & A SISTER, around; 1838, below, rosettes to either side of date. REV: Around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; center, olive wreath enclosing LIBERTY/1838 (date weakly struck).

By the late 1830s, the anti-slavery movement in America was gaining momentum, and the slavery question would come to dominate national politics, leading to a sectional crisis in subsequent decades. In late 1837, the American Anti-Slavery Society, based in New York, commissioned a local die-sinker to produce a copper token, patterned after the Conder Halfpenny, substituting a female for a male slave in the obverse design. The Society began selling the tokens through its publication, The Emancipator, to raise money for the cause.

Along with the many so-called Hard Times Tokens issued during the Van Buren presidency, they were made to purposefully resemble a U.S. Large Cent. This fact did not go unnoticed by the Mint, which moved to suppress their production, though with little success. A classic American political token.

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